Blog/News

A Trip to the Dali: Checking out St. Pete’s Salvador Dali Museum

Who wouldn’t want to go inside a Salvador Dali painting? I thought as I heard about a new virtual reality exhibit feature at the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida.  I have always wanted to check out this museum showcasing one of recent history’s most intriguing artists, which, oddly I thought (and so apropos) happened to be located not so far from me in St. Pete, of all places. How a Salvador Dali museum happened to be in St. Pete is a whole story there, but a bit later on that.

Salvador Dali is generally known as a Surrealist with his most famous painting of wilted clocks in The Persistence of Memory. However, the museum shows a far richer and more complete body of work that extends beyond the Surrealist movement of the 1930s.  Dali the man, with his preferences, insecurities, vulnerabilities, eccentricities, and motivations is revealed throughout this extensive collection. The museum does a great job of showing Dali’s artistic progression starting when he was a teenager in Catalonia, working in impressionism and cubism, through his rise as a Surrealist in the 1920s and ‘30s, his exile to America from 1940-1948, his fascination with scientific discoveries in nuclear physics and his application of that to a form of art that he dubbed “Nuclear Mysticism” and then his experimentation with other art forms such as film leading to a collaboration with Walt Disney and other filmmakers.

This brings us to a special exhibit now showing at the museum through June titled “Dare to Dream: Disney & Dali: Architects of the Imagination.” Walt Disney and Dali were contemporaries, each rising in stature and recognition at about the same time in the 1930s. When Dali came to America in 1940 to avoid the expanding war in Europe, he went to California and met Disney in person—and it is this fascinating dynamic of two highly creative minds that the special exhibit explores.

Dali wanted to further delve into film as a medium for his art. In France he had collaborated with Luis Buñuel on two surrealist films, Un Chien Andalou in 1929 and L’Age D’Or in 1930 with mixed success. Walt Disney, however, had become known as being on the cutting edge of filmmaking with innovations and developing his own technologies that enhanced the viewer’s experience. For example, just synchronizing sound with cartoons in Steamboat Willie was an early innovation. Using movable cameras through a 3-D drawn set to show depth was another innovation. It was this culture of innovation that drew Dali to Disney. Disney likewise was naturally interested in an artist like Dali with his dream-like visuals and creative spirit that he could bring to the Disney team of artists. This shows up in a movie like Fantasia which broke new ground for Disney as a master work of art even though it was less than successful commercially.

How Dali would be amazed and appreciative of the technologies available today that enhance the experience through multiple mediums. This brings us to one of the highlights of the current exhibit at the museum: taking one of Dali’s paintings, Archeological Reminiscence of Millet’s “Angelus” (1935) and providing a multi-sensory virtual reality experience. The painting itself is classic Dali in his Surrealist period: haunting and enigmatic. Simply looking at the painting, at a distance, one feels out of place, yet, go inside through the immersive virtual reality tour and you are suddenly on another planet, probably located in Dali’s mind, exploring some depths that keep you feeling uneasy and off-balance, yet knowing it’s still a fascinating place and you want to stay a while longer because you’ve never been there before. You are used to the sunny blue skies and verdant foliage of Florida, not the chalk-grey barren landscape with imposing towers ruling as oppressive masters. The experience lasted three minutes, and since we were one of the first in the museum at the opening and no one else was in line at that time, we got to go again – what a score! The only thing that would have been even better was to somehow link up with my wife, who was right next to me in her own VR world, and explore together. But perhaps that would take away from the chilling aloneness that is meant to be felt.

Here is a taste:

Dali would have loved how we can now take one of his paintings drawn on canvas, a medium readily available to him at the time, and expand its boundaries to be experienced through a new immersive medium. Dali said that a true artist is not one who is inspired, but one who inspires others. I think new forms of medium such as VR will allow artists new ways to be inspired.

There is much more in the museum and in the Dali & Disney exhibit, but that is for you to explore and discover.

I was interested in how this museum came to be in St. Pete. That story goes back to 1942 when shortly before getting married, A. Reynolds Morse and Eleanor Morse attended a Dalí exhibit at the Cleveland Museum of Art. That’s when they were drawn to Dali’s works and later purchased what would be the first of hundreds of paintings, Daddy Longlegs of the Evening – Hope! (see below) In fact, they ended up becoming a major patron of Dali. Reynolds Morse was a businessman who made his fortune in injection molding supply in Cleveland.  I was wondering if Morse had any connection to the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art in Winter Park, FL. After doing some research, it doesn’t seem so. There is one interesting coincidental Winter Park connection, however. Eleanor Morse (nee Reese) went to Rollins College and studied music.

The Tampa Bay Tribune describes how the vast collection held by the Morse couple came to be located in St. Pete:

To avoid the collection’s dispersal for tax reasons when they died, the Morses decided to give it to a museum with the promise that it would be kept intact. Every major institution they approached wanted the right to sell some of it.

The Wall Street Journal wrote a story in January 1980 about their dilemma that caught the eye of Jim Martin, a St. Petersburg lawyer. He and a city official called on them in Cleveland to pitch the idea of a Dali Museum in St. Petersburg.

The first site was in a renovated warehouse, however, the present beautifully designed building, was completed in 2008 and sits right on the waterfront.  Reynolds Morse died in 2000 at the age of 85 and Eleanor lived until age 97, passing away in 2010.  What a significant and generous gift they made.

The museum is open daily 10am to 5:30pm except Thursday when it stays open until 8:00pm. The Dali and Disney exhibit runs through June 12.  If you have kids, check out the programs they have specifically for children. We tagged along for a little bit on the back end of a school tour and the guide was fantastic engaging with the students.

The first Dali painting purchased by Reynolds and Eleanor Morse and now displayed at the Salvador Dali museum in St. Petersburg, FL:
Daddy Longlegs of the Evening – Hope!

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Never Underestimate the Power of a Kind Word

We all need a little pep talk now and then. I remember one time I was heading out to travel cross-country to join a new Navy Reserve unit and I was a bit nervous about this new assignment. Seems kind of odd since after 20 years this wasn’t my first rodeo, yet I was still anxious about how I would be received and perceived by a large group of folks who I had never met before. My wife sensed this from me and gave me some encouragement by saying, “You’re a nice guy, they will like you. You will do fine.” That was really all I needed to get my focus back and not to worry.

Captain Stew Fisher touches on the power of a kind word in today’s excerpt from his book on leadership, Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership.

Never Underestimate the Power of a Kind Word

Everyone needs acknowledgement, to know they matter. An encouraging word has unbelievable power to motivate. But it must be absolutely sincere. Anything less undermines your credibility and does nothing for the person hearing it, except perhaps, to sow doubt in their own abilities, “Why am I receiving false praise?”

As a leader, open your eyes and manage by walking around. There’s a lot of good happening around you. Your job is to notice it and acknowledge it! You’ll never come close to seeing it all. But don’t miss seeing as much as you can. That well-timed word of praise is energizing to your team and gives a remarkable boost to morale. They’ll know you really care about them. And give acknowledgement as soon as you see it. It means far more than some award given long after the fact.

Are you aware of how much good is going on behind the scenes? Do you make an effort to acknowledge it? Are you stuck behind your desk? Do people on your team see you walking around every day, interested in them? Do you ask about their families in addition to their work? Or are all of your conversations with them merely superficial, lacking genuine interest?

– Excerpted from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership by Captain R. Stewart Fisher. All rights reserved.

Captain Stew Fisher is a cum laude graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He retired from the Navy in 1998 after 31 years of service spanning the Vietnam War and Desert Storm.

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Acknowledge Your Benefactors

For a Naval Officer, command at sea is usually the pinnacle of one’s career. Being entrusted with the awesome responsibility of being in charge of a ship, submarine or aviation squadron is the culmination of a lifetime’s worth of preparation, training, and extraordinary effort.  However, no one gets to that point by themself. Rather, they have been supported, pushed and pulled along by a host of teachers, coaches, mentors, classmates, shipmates, and friends, not to mention parents and other family members.  Most recognize that. Although, I remember hearing the Admiral in charge of the U.S. Submarine Force a couple years ago speak about this – he said that he reminds his new Commanding Officers that they didn’t get to where they were on their own – they owe and will owe the success they have in their tour as CO to their crew. Again, I think most of them know that and you will typically hear  during a change of command ceremony the outgoing Commanding Officer recognize and thank his Sailors for their hard work and efforts.

A good visual of this comes to my mind. The Herndon monument climb ceremony marks the end of plebe year at the Naval Academy. An entire year spent at the bottom rung of the midshipman ladder comes to an end with one final tasking: someone from the plebe class must climb a 21-foot tall granite obelisk smothered inches thick in slippery lard and remove a sailor hat that the plebes wear and replace it with a “combination cover” – a hat more similar to an officer’s hat. And oh by the way, that plebe sailor hat is taped down quite well. It can take several hours to pull this off, but the key is working together with the plebes standing on each other’s shoulders making several layers until finally one is hoisted to the top of the monument and able to change out the cover. Legend even has it that the one who does this will be the first Admiral from that class. The symbolic aspect of this is striking—each one standing on another’s shoulders to reach the top.

All of us, whether we realize it or not, stand on the shoulders of those who have come before us. Those who have built our country and our communities and who have sacrificed in doing so. Some have paid the ultimate sacrifice.

Captain Stew Fisher, in his book on leadership, Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership, reminds us that it’s important to reflect on all those who have helped us in our own journey.

Acknowledge Your Benefactors

No one ever makes it on her own. While we might like to think our achievements are solo efforts, there were a lot of people who helped along the way. Often they were the unsung heroes of your past: parents, teachers, friends, coaches, and other teammates.

If you take all the credit yourself, it is highly unlikely that you’ll ever get help again. That’s when you’ll discover that you really didn’t make it on your own. But by then, it may be impossible to assemble a new team. No one will want to worship at your altar again.

Are you a solo act? Or do you acknowledge the people that helped you along the way?

– Excerpted from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership by Captain R. Stewart Fisher. All rights reserved.

Captain Stew Fisher is a cum laude graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He retired from the Navy in 1998 after 31 years of service spanning the Vietnam War and Desert Storm.

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Recognize the Unsung Heroes

As a leader, we need to take the time to listen to our junior team members — many times they have the best ideas. This is an area where the culture of the military falls short — especially on large staffs. The leadership tends to become insulated and the opinions of lower ranking members are not taken into consideration. Admiral Rickover, the father of the nuclear navy, recognized this liability long ago when he set up his staff and mandated that everyone wear civilian clothes — including himself. That removed part of this obstacle. He valued technical excellence over seniority or rank.

Stew Fisher continues with that theme in this excerpt from his book  Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership.

Recognize the Unsung Heroes

Often we become star struck, placing too much value on celebrity. Worshiping the rich and famous has become a national obsession. With cult-like fervor, we hang on their every word, giving them far too much importance. Sadly, movie stars or famous athletes are able to carry large blocks of voters simply because of their celebrity, not their ideas. But a closer examination often shows that they lack any depth of character at all. In fact, their pampered lives have only turned them into prima donnas who really haven’t accomplished much in life, other than being famous.

We might learn more wisdom from the single mom working two jobs while trying to raise four kids. Or the tired coal miner, coming home from a hard day’s work, but still willing to toss a baseball with his son in the back yard. Or the underpaid school teacher, working late grading papers and preparing the next day’s lesson plan.

Perhaps the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center taught us who our real heroes are. They’re the everyday men and women earning paychecks, raising families, and caring for aging parents. They’ve gained true wisdom by living lives that are real and meaningful.

I doubt if anyone can name the last five Miss America winners. How about the last five MVP’s of the National Football League? Or the last five Olympic gold medalists in the 100-meter dash? But we can all remember five coaches or teachers who had real impact on our lives. These are the unsung heroes who really matter! And these are the people we should really be listening to.

Whom do you listen to on your team? Do you ever pay attention to the little guy, or only those with power, an impressive title, and a fancy office? Do you dismiss a good idea, simply because the person offering it has little status? If so, you’re missing out on some of the best input. However, if you show a willingness to listen to everyone’s ideas, regardless of their rank in the company, you’ll receive so many good ones it will be hard to implement them all. Word will soon get out, “The boss really cares what we think.”

– Excerpted from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership by Captain R. Stewart Fisher. All rights reserved.

Captain Stew Fisher is a cum laude graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He retired from the Navy in 1998 after 31 years of service spanning the Vietnam War and Desert Storm.

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Don’t Let Evil Discourage You

Ever since I was in 5th grade, with subscriptions in hand to Time magazine and US News & World Report, I’ve been a news junkie.  With the kind of news we see, I’m lucky to have kept my mental stability. (Or have I?) In any case, one can easily get lost in the despair that is reported on a daily basis. Captain Stew Fisher places the news in the proper context with this excerpt from his book on leadership: Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership.

Don’t Let Evil Discourage You

It’s hard not to become discouraged when we open the paper every morning and read about the evil all around us. Rapes, bombings, genocide, child molestation, sniper attacks, murders, and mayhem fill the pages. All of us have had the thought, “What is this world coming to!”

But perhaps we can take comfort in this fact: The reason it’s news is that it’s the exception. The vast majority of people in the world are good, and every day they are making positive contributions in their own little corners of the world. In fact, their basic goodness is so commonplace, it isn’t newsworthy.

So don’t let evil discourage you. Spread your own light every day and resolve to make the world a better place. The collective contributions of the good people in this world far outweigh the bad.

Have you allowed yourself to be overwhelmed, disheartened, and immobilized by the evil around you? Have you overlooked the good that actually exists and your own ability to contribute to a better world? Realize that good is destined to one day triumph over evil, and you have a large part to play in that ultimate victory. Let that empower your leadership in a troubled world.

– Excerpted from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership by Captain R. Stewart Fisher. All rights reserved.

Captain Stew Fisher is a cum laude graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He retired from the Navy in 1998 after 31 years of service spanning the Vietnam War and Desert Storm.

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Ransomware: Don’t Be a Victim

Have you heard of ransomware?  The concept isn’t necessarily new but it has taken on a greater urgency with more and more small businesses (and individuals) being victimized.

Here’s what happened to Mark Stefanick when he encountered ramsomware on his computer as recently detailed in the Wall Street Journal:

Mark Stefanick, president of a small Houston-based firm, Advantage Benefits Solutions, was shocked when one of his consultants suddenly found his work computer locked. Within hours, rogue computer code had spread from the consultant’s computer to the server and backup system at the firm. The code encrypted the claims information and financial data.

A ransom note popped up on the infected computer: Pay $400 within 72 hours to unlock the data.

Stefanick’s initial reaction was to not give in and to try and restore his company’s files on his own. However, he soon discovered that this ransomware used a very sophisticated encryption method that would take thousands of hours to break. Since the ransom was set low enough that it cost less in time and money than it would to hire outside IT consultants to free the files, Stefanick capitulated.

According to the FBI, they are seeing an “increasing number of incidents involving so-called ‘drive-by’ ransomware, where users can infect their computers simply by clicking on a compromised website, often lured there by a deceptive e-mail or pop-up window.”  Victims are also now being asked to pay up in Bitcoin – the digital currency that is very difficult to trace.

Figures are difficult to obtain on how much money these ransomware schemes are collecting from their victims, but the FBI estimates that just one ransomware product reaped $5 million in a year – and that is just one of thousands of ransomware products that are extorting hundreds of dollars a shot.

How can one prevent this from happening? Cybersecurity expert and author Terry Sadler says that:

The best defense against ransomware is to have a backup plan in place. If you are routinely backing up your critical files and have them stored offline or in the cloud then you can easily recover from this type of ransomware. If you are hit with CryptoLocker then you are in luck because FireEye and Fox-IT teamed up together to provide a free service for anyone affected by CryptoLocker…

Here is the link to the free tool to unlock your files if you are hit with Cryptolocker: https://www.decryptcryptolocker.com/

In Terry’s book Cybersecurity for Everyone: Securing your home or small business network, he discusses in easy-to-follow detail how you can protect yourself, your family, and/or your small business from falling victim to not only ransomware, but other hacks, malware, and schemes that could cost a lot in time, money, and lost files.  Here is a brief excerpt from his section on the subject of phishing and malware protection:

Each browser uses a slightly different technology to help block known malicious websites. Chrome, Firefox, and Safari use Google’s Safe Browsing Application  Programming Interface (API). Google’s Safe Browsing is a service that allows these browsers to use the service to automatically check URLs against Google’s database of known or suspected phishing and malware pages. Browsers that only use Google’s Safe Browsing API do not have the same level of protection as Google’s Chrome browser. This is because Google has included additional protection within the Chrome browser to defend against drive-by malware downloads. Internet Explorer, on the other hand, uses its SmartScreen Filter, which works in much the same way as Google’s Safe Browsing API service. The SmartScreen Filter also checks files downloaded from the Internet against a dynamically changing list of known malicious software.

There is so much in here that we can and should do. There was a time and place in America where folks didn’t bother locking their doors – they lived in a safe community. That’s no longer the case either with our homes or with our computers. It’s important for everyone, whether you just have a home network, or if you have a small business, to take the steps necessary to “lock your doors” and prevent costly intrusions which can and do happen.

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No One is an Island

Over the last couple of weeks, we have looked at the first section of Captain Stew Fisher’s book on leadership Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership which focused on self mastery. Now, we expand our circle in the next section, improving interactions.

Remember, “No Man is an Island”

John Donne said, “Never ask for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.” What did he mean?

To understand, we must transport ourselves to England during that time, the 16th Century. Back then, nearly everyone lived in rural farming villages. The church was the tallest building in town, and the church bell rang out for all important events. When it tolled, it announced to all the villagers out in their fields that a death had occurred. But rather than asking, “Who died?” John Donne wants us to realize that the death of any villager really means that a part of the village has died as well, since we’re all connected in our humanity.

So it is on any team. We rely on each other. A victory for one is a victory for all. As the signers of the Declaration of Independence said with gallows humor, “If we don’t hang together, then they will surely hang us separately.”

As a leader, does your team hang together? Do they feel connected? Or do you treat them like interchangeable parts in a machine, overlooking their shared humanity?

– Excerpted from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership by Captain R. Stewart Fisher. All rights reserved.

Captain Stew Fisher is a cum laude graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He retired from the Navy in 1998 after 31 years of service spanning the Vietnam War and Desert Storm.

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Don’t Fear Being a “Work in Progress”

Ever feel like you are in a rut? That you are just going through the motions? Maybe it’s fear that you don’t want to try something new because you won’t get it right or that you are afraid to begin a new pursuit because you are not prepared for it.Captain Stew Fisher touches on this in today’s excerpt from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership.

Don’t Fear Being a “Work in Progress”

Life’s journey is one of motion. If you stand still, you stagnate and eventually die.

Have you ever noticed what often happens to retirees who don’t find a new pursuit? Within a year of two, they are often dead. Contrast that to Morihei Ueshiba, the greatest martial artist Japan has ever known. He practiced Aikido until the day he died at 86. His art was always growing, evolving, and improving.

In a lifetime, we can never achieve perfection. The most we can hope for is increasing excellence. Never stop moving forward. Seek new challenges. Attempt to master new and difficult areas. No one should ever arrive at a “destination,” even in a lifetime.

Do you think you’ve arrived? Have you chosen to stagnate on a plateau? Have you and your team stopped growing, learning, and creating? If so, what are you doing to shake things up and seek the next challenge?

– Excerpted from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership by Captain R. Stewart Fisher. All rights reserved.

Captain Stew Fisher is a cum laude graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He retired from the Navy in 1998 after 31 years of service spanning the Vietnam War and Desert Storm.

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Make a Point to Unwind and Recharge Your Batteries

Some folks, ok we’ll call them workaholics, will literally go years without taking a vacation. They think they are being productive, but are they really? I’m not sure that staring at one’s cubicle walls day after day, year after year makes anyone more innovative, creative, or functional.  For a number of years I worked in the vacation ownership industry and I would hear from owners that they (or more likely their spouses) wanted to purchase a timeshare in order to force them to take one break at least once a year. Not a bad strategy.

In this excerpt from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership, Captain Stew Fisher talks about the need to take a break.

Unwind and Recharge Your Batteries

Life is not a continuous sprint. Even NASCAR drivers know that they can’t keep the pedal to the metal the entire race. They must pace themselves and their finely-tuned machines in order to finish.

Yet, we often insist on burning ourselves out, failing to take a needed break and unwind. In the long run, we do great physical, mental, and emotional damage to ourselves. We not only risk being able to complete the immediate task at hand, but more importantly, our life’s work.

Easing off on the accelerator is absolutely necessary. Take a break and do something relaxing and enjoyable, even if it seems a frivolous waste of time. In truth, it’s an investment in your own physical, mental, and emotional health. You’ll quickly discover renewed energy. Your creativity will be released and your spirits will soar. In the long run, you’ll accomplish far more than if you kept your nose to the grindstone without taking a break.

Do you allow time to recharge your batteries, or are you continually burning the candle at both ends? Would your team call you a slave driver? When was the last time you got away from the office together and just had some fun? When was the last company picnic? Were families invited? Do your people look tired? Are they leaving work in time to have dinner at home? What kind of hours are they keeping? Do you even know? Do you promote a physical fitness program? Or are the only benefits you offer monetary?

– Excerpted from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership by Captain R. Stewart Fisher. All rights reserved.

Captain Stew Fisher is a cum laude graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He retired from the Navy in 1998 after 31 years of service spanning the Vietnam War and Desert Storm.

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The Value of Patience

It’s been said that it takes at least 10,000 hours to truly master a new skill. Given that the average number of working hours in a year is 2,000, it really requires time, patience, and practice to become a master.  Captain Stew Fisher tackles the patience part of that equation in today’s excerpt from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership.

Understand the Value of Patience

Becoming a better leader has much in common with learning Aikido, learning to fly, or any other new skill. Often, progress comes in a series of breakthroughs, after weeks of seeming stagnation.

The human mind needs a gestation period to consolidate and process the many inputs that ultimately create a unified whole. Like planting, fertilizing, and then harvesting, it’s a process that can’t be rushed or abbreviated. Learning follows those same patterns of nature. Improvement will happen when it happens. Just enjoy the journey. There will be learning plateaus in anything new you attempt to master. But overall, when you look back, you’ll see the progress you’ve made.

Comparing yourself to others will only frustrate you. We all have our eureka moments at different times, unique for each individual. Trust that your daily effort towards improvement works if you can just be patient. Strive to be a little better than you were the day before. Realize that even during those seeming periods of stagnation or regression, learning, growth, and improvement are actually going on.

As a leader, are you able to see improvement as a natural process, one that takes time and patience? Or do you expect an immediate harvest, without tilling and planting the soil first? Are your decisions short sighted, governed by the tyranny of the quarterly report? Or are you able to think strategically with your focus on long term goals? Do you take shortcuts just to look good now, but risk the long term health of the company? Do you invest time developing your future leaders, or do you do make all the decisions rather than take a chance that they’ll make a mistake?

– Excerpted from Leave a Legacy: Reflections on the Strategies of Great Leadership by Captain R. Stewart Fisher. All rights reserved.

Captain Stew Fisher is a cum laude graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He retired from the Navy in 1998 after 31 years of service spanning the Vietnam War and Desert Storm.

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